PublicationsJuly 26, 2013

Government Surveillance: A Question Wording Experiment

In the wake of leaked information about the government’s telephone and digital surveillance programs last month, public opinion surveys reported a wide range of reactions. For example, a Pew Research Center/Washington Post survey conducted immediately after the revelations found broad support for the program, while a Gallup survey conducted just days later found more […]

PublicationsNovember 7, 2012

A Comparison of Results from Surveys by the Pew Research Center and Google Consumer Surveys

As internet use grows– whether through a traditional computer, tablet, gaming device or cell phone – new techniques are being developed to conduct social research and measure people’s behavior and opinion while they are online. The Pew Research Center has been exploring these new techniques for measuring public opinion and critically evaluating how they compare […]

PublicationsAugust 3, 2012

Party Affiliation and Election Polls

In every campaign cycle, pollwatchers pay close attention to the details of every election survey. And well they should. But focusing on the partisan balance of surveys is, in almost every circumstance, the wrong place to look. The latest Pew Research Center survey conducted July 16-26 among 1,956 registered voters nationwide found 51% supporting Barack […]

PublicationsMay 15, 2012

Assessing the Representativeness of Public Opinion Surveys

For decades survey research has provided trusted data about political attitudes and voting behavior, the economy, health, education, demography and many other topics. But political and media surveys are facing significant challenges as a consequence of societal and technological changes. It has become increasingly difficult to contact potential respondents and to persuade them to […]

PublicationsNovember 22, 2010

The Growing Gap between Landline and Dual Frame Election Polls

PublicationsNovember 22, 2010

The Growing Gap between Landline and Dual Frame Election Polls; Republican Vote Share Bigger in Landline-Only Surveys

A new analysis of Pew Research Center pre-election surveys conducted this year finds that support for Republican candidates was significantly higher in samples based only on landlines than in dual frame samples that combined landline and cell phone interviews. The difference in the margin among likely voters this year is about twice as large as in 2008.

PublicationsOctober 13, 2010

Cell Phones and Election Polls: An Update

PublicationsMay 20, 2010

Assessing the Cell Phone Challenge

PublicationsOctober 14, 2009

But What Do the Polls Show?

PublicationsJuly 9, 2009

Accurately Locating Where Wireless Respondents Live Requires More Than A Phone Number

PublicationsJune 25, 2009

Perils of Polling in Election ’08

PublicationsMarch 3, 2009

New Tricks for Old — and New — Dogs: Challenges and Opportunities Facing Communications Research

PublicationsJanuary 22, 2009

Understanding Likely Voters

PublicationsDecember 18, 2008

Calling Cell Phones In ’08 Pre-Election Polls

PublicationsDecember 18, 2008

Bush and Public Opinion

Overview: Bush and Public Opinion As George W. Bush prepares to leave the White House, the United States is in many ways dramatically different from when he took the oath of office in 2001. His first few months as president were largely unremarkable, despite the contentious 2000 election. But the horrific terror attacks of Sept. […]

PublicationsDecember 16, 2008

What a Year! People-Press Poll Reports in 2008

PublicationsOctober 17, 2008

Poll Power

PublicationsSeptember 23, 2008

Cell Phones and the 2008 Vote: An Update

PublicationsJuly 17, 2008

Cell Phones and the 2008 Vote: An Update

PublicationsMay 22, 2008

Research Roundup: Latest Findings on Cell Phones and Polling