Mar. 20, 2008

A ’Brute Force’ Estimation of the Residence Rate for Undetermined Telephone Numbers in an RDD Survey

Jan. 31, 2008

The Impact Of “Cell-Onlys” On Public Opinion Polling

Summary of Findings The proportion of Americans who rely solely on a cell phone for their telephone service continues to grow, as does the share who still have a landline phone but do most of their calling on their cell phone. With these changes, there is an increased concern that polls conducted only on landline […]

Jan. 10, 2008

Getting It Wrong

The failure of the New Hampshire pre-election surveys to mirror the outcome of the Democratic race is one of the most significant miscues in modern polling history. All the published polls, including those that surveyed through Monday, had Sen. Barack Obama comfortably ahead with an average margin of more than 8 percent. These same polls […]

Jul. 2, 2007

“Frequently Asked Questions” about Pew’s Muslim American Survey

Jun. 20, 2007

How Serious Is Polling’s Cell-Only Problem?

According to government statistics released last month, nearly 13% of U.S. households cannot now be reached by the typical telephone survey because they have only a cell phone and no landline telephone, and the share of Americans who are cell-only is increasing rapidly. To monitor this problem, the Pew Research Center conducted four studies in […]

Jun. 20, 2007

What’s Missing from National RDD Surveys? The Impact of the Growing Cell-Only Population

Jun. 20, 2007

What’s Missing from National RDD Surveys? The Impact of the Growing Cell-Only Population

Oct. 26, 2006

Cell-Only Voters Not Very Different

Oct. 26, 2006

Cell-Only Voters Not Very Different: Fewer Registered, More First-time Voters

Oct. 26, 2006

Are National Polls Reliable Predictors of Midterm Elections?

May. 15, 2006

The Cell Phone Challenge to Survey Research

Summary of Findings A growing number of Americans rely solely on a cell phone for their telephone service, and many more are considering giving up their landline phones. This trend presents a challenge to public opinion polling, which typically relies on a random sample of the population of landline subscribers. A new study of the […]

Jul. 16, 2004

Horse Race Polls Not More Variable This Year

Lead Changes Contribute to Erroneous Perception

Apr. 20, 2004

Polls Face Growing Resistance, But Still Representative

Summary of Findings Faced with a growing number of unsolicited telephone calls and armed with increasingly sophisticated technology for screening their calls, more Americans are refusing to participate in telephone polls than was the case just six years ago. Yet a survey research experiment to gauge the effects of respondent cooperation on survey quality indicates […]

Apr. 20, 2004

Gauging the Impact of Growing Nonresponse on Estimates from a National RDD Telephone Survey

Public Opinion Quarterly 70: 759-779 (2006) – This article provides more extensive analysis of data from the study reported in Polls Face Growing Resistance, But Still Representative.

Jan. 29, 2004

A Good Day for the Pollsters

The Accuracy of Pre-Election Tracking Polls in New Hampshire

Oct. 1, 2002

Why The Generic Ballot Test?

Throughout the election season, the Pew Research Center and other major polling organizations report a measure that political insiders sometimes call “the generic ballot.” This measure is the percentage of voters in national surveys who say they intend to vote for either the Republican or the Democratic candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in […]

Sep. 29, 2002

Simply Put, The Public’s View Can’t Be Put Simply

by Andrew Kohut in The Washington Post

May. 18, 2001

Screening Likely Voters: A Survey Experiment

Introduction and Summary Traditionally, pollsters trying to accurately assess voter intentions have struggled with a basic problem — figuring out who actually is going to show up to vote. In the 2000 election campaign, sharp fluctuations in the Gallup Organization’s daily tracking poll were blamed by some on difficulties in nailing down likely voters. Similar […]

Mar. 4, 1999

Does an early lead in the polls usually hold up?

A stream of candidate announcements and polls showing Texas Governor George W. Bush leading Vice President Al Gore have spurred interest in the 2000 presidential contest. But with the nominating conventions still more than 16 months away, what do these early polls mean for would-be nominees? A look back at nearly 40 years of early […]

Jan. 27, 1999

Consequences of Reducing Nonresponses in a National Telephone Survey