PublicationsSeptember 13, 2016

The Parties on the Eve of the 2016 Election: Two Coalitions, Moving Further Apart

Ahead of the presidential election, the demographic profiles of the Republican and Democratic parties are strikingly different.

Multi-section ReportsJune 22, 2016

Partisanship and Political Animosity in 2016

The 2016 campaign is unfolding against a backdrop of intense partisan division and animosity. Partisans’ views of the opposing party are now more negative than at any point in nearly a quarter of a century.

PublicationsApril 30, 2015

A Different Look at Generations and Partisanship

Survey Report Over the past decade, there has been a pronounced age gap in American politics. Younger Americans have been the Democratic Party’s strongest supporters in both vote preferences  and partisanship, while older Americans have been the most reliably Republican. The Pew Research Center’s report earlier this month on partisan identification found that 51% of […]

PublicationsApril 7, 2015

A Deep Dive Into Party Affiliation

39% of Americans identify as independents, more than they do as Democrats ( 32%) or as Republicans (23%). This is the highest percentage of independents in more than 75 years of public opinion polling.

PublicationsOctober 17, 2014

Political Polarization in Action: Insights into the 2014 Election from the American Trends Panel

Survey Report The Pew Research Center has developed a new tool for looking at the 2014 elections – a panel survey that enables us to check in with the same representative group of Americans several times during the course of the campaign. This survey includes far more information about respondents than is found in a […]

PublicationsJune 26, 2014

Beyond Red vs. Blue: The Political Typology

Our latest political typology sorts voters into cohesive groups based on their attitudes and values and provides a field guide for the constantly changing political landscape.

Multi-section ReportsJune 12, 2014

Political Polarization in the American Public

Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan acrimony is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in recent history. And these trends manifest themselves in myriad ways, both in politics and in everyday life.