Sep. 24, 2008

Section 1: Policy Priorities and America’s Global Image

With widespread economic uncertainty at home, the public clearly wants the next president to devote most of his attention to domestic, rather than overseas, matters. Six-in-ten Americans say it is more important for the next president to focus on domestic policy rather than foreign policy, compared with just 21% who say foreign policy should be […]

May. 29, 2008

Section 2: Views of National Conditions and Campaign Issues

Just 18% of Americans say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country today, down from 22% in March and 27% at the end of 2007. This represents a new low in 20 years of Pew Research Center polling. Previously, the lowest measure of satisfaction was in September 1993 when 20% […]

Mar. 14, 2008

What Foreign Policy Agenda?

Issues have hardly played a dominant role in the nominating races, especially on the Democratic side. Still, the public has a clear domestic agenda for the next president. Fix the economy, reduce health care costs, improve the environment, reform education, deal with rising energy costs and so on. This hearty appetite for an assertive domestic […]

Feb. 28, 2008

Section 1: General Election Patterns of Support

Obama and Clinton both hold modest leads over McCain in a general election matchup; Obama has a 50% to 43% lead and Clinton holds a 50% to 45% edge. But Clinton draws more universal support among Democrats (89%) than does Obama (81%). Conversely, Obama leads McCain slightly among independents (49% to 43%), while McCain edges […]

Feb. 28, 2008

Section 2: Candidate Images

While McCain’s image has improved among Republicans, it has slipped decidedly among both Democrats and independents in recent weeks. As a result, the share of registered voters who say they have an unfavorable view of the likely Republican nominee is at a new high of 38%, up from 31% on the eve of Super Tuesday. […]

Dec. 4, 2007

GOP Race Unsettled in Politically Diverse Early States

Summary of Findings Republican voter sentiment in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina is highly fluid. Compared with Democratic voters, likely Republican voters in these three politically disparate states express less enthusiasm about their field of presidential candidates, and many Republicans voice only modest support for their choices. Mike Huckabee runs even with Mitt Romney […]

Dec. 3, 2007

Democratic Primary Preview: Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina

Summary of Findings Democrats enter the presidential primary campaign upbeat about their candidates and united in their views on major issues. Sen. Hillary Clinton is the clear frontrunner in New Hampshire and South Carolina, where she holds 19-point and 14-point leads, respectively. However in Iowa she is in a statistical tie with Barack Obama. Clinton […]

May. 29, 2007

Baker-Hamilton Redux

Four months after the bipartisan Iraq Study Group proposed a number of new policy options for dealing with the Iraq conflict, these proposals remain broadly popular with the public. Read full analysis at Pewresearch.org

Jun. 6, 2006

Two Americas, One American

Feb. 21, 2006

Youth and War

Nov. 17, 2005

Opinion Leaders Turn Cautious, Public Looks Homeward

Introduction and Summary Preoccupied with war abroad and growing problems at home, U.S. opinion leaders and the general public are taking a decidedly cautious view of America’s place in the world. Over the past four years, opinion leaders have become less supportive of the United States playing a “first among equals” role among the world’s […]

Nov. 17, 2005

I. The State of the World and America’s Global Role

As dissatisfied as Americans are with things at home, they hold an even more negative opinion of the state of the world. In early October, Pew polling found just 29% of Americans satisfied with the way things are going in their country today, while 65% said they were dissatisfied — the most negative national assessment […]

Nov. 17, 2005

II. Global Policy Goals and Threats

The existential threats posed by terrorism and the spread of weapons of mass destruction rate as leading long-term U.S. policy concerns, in the view of both opinion leaders and the public. But there also is a widely shared belief that decreasing the nation’s dependence on imported energy should be a major policy objective. Fully 87% […]

May. 10, 2005

Part 4: Beyond Red vs. Blue: Value Divides Within the Party Coalitions

In an era when virtually all political issues are seen through partisan lenses, the political typology still finds numerous value cleavages in American society, many of which cut across party lines. In fact, public values about security and the use of military force are among the only value dimensions in which Republican and Democratic groups […]

Apr. 6, 2005

IV. The Dean Activists

Different Kind of Democrat Dean activists are a distinctive group within their own party. As a group, they are much more racially homogenous than the general public or Democrats. More than nine-in-ten Dean activists (92%) are white and just 1% are African American. By comparison, the public is 79% white, as are about two-thirds of […]

Jan. 13, 2005

Additional Findings and Analyses

Most Important Problem In an open-ended format, roughly one-in-three Americans (32%) volunteer the situation in Iraq as the most important problem facing the nation. This represents twice as many people as a year ago, when the public’s outlook about Iraq was much more positive in the wake of Saddam Hussein’s capture. When combined with terrorism, […]

Aug. 18, 2004

Part One: The Importance of International Affairs to the American Public

Barring a sizable shift in public opinion over the next few months, the 2004 election will be the first since the Vietnam era in which foreign affairs and national security issues are a higher public priority than the economy. Currently, four-in-ten Americans (41%) cite international and defense issues such as the Iraq war and terrorism […]

Aug. 18, 2004

Part Four: Beliefs About Foreign Policy

Americans today believe the guiding principles of U.S. foreign policy should be morality, caution and decisiveness. Fully 72% of the public says following moral principles should be a top priority in the way the U.S. conducts foreign policy. Roughly two-thirds (66%) say being cautious should be a top priority and 62% place equal importance on […]

Aug. 18, 2004

Part Five: Opinion About the Bush Administration’s Stewardship

President Bush still receives fairly strong marks for his handling of terrorism, particularly when compared with his low ratings on other key components of foreign policy. In the July 8-18 survey, conducted prior to the Democratic convention and the government’s announcement of elevated terrorism alert, a 54% majority approve of Bush’s performance in handling terrorist […]

Aug. 18, 2004

Commentary by Council on Foreign Relations

On Foreign Policy, Red and Blue Voters Are Worlds Apart By Lee Feinstein, James M. Lindsay, and Max Boot, Council on Foreign Relations Sixteen months after the Iraq invasion, the red-state, blue-state divide has bled into foreign policy. A new poll by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, in association with […]