Sep. 27, 2012

In Changing News Landscape, Even Television is Vulnerable

The transformation of the nation’s news landscape has already taken a heavy toll on print news sources, particularly print newspapers. But there are now signs that television news – which so far has held onto its audience through the rise of the internet – also is increasingly vulnerable, as it may be losing its […]

Feb. 7, 2012

Section 1: Campaign Interest and News Sources

The 2012 presidential campaign is drawing significantly less interest than the 2008 campaign from Democrats and younger people. According to the Pew Research Center’s News Interest Index surveys over the course of January, 30% of Democrats have been following election news very closely, down from 42% in January 2008, during the primary contest between Barack […]

Sep. 12, 2010

Americans Spending More Time Following the News

There are many more ways to get the news these days, and as a consequence Americans are spending more time with the news than over much of the past decade. Digital platforms are playing a larger role in news consumption, and they seem to be more than making up for modest declines in the […]

Sep. 12, 2010

Section 1: Watching, Reading and Listening to the News

When asked if they had a chance to read a daily newspaper yesterday, just 31% of Americans say they read a newspaper, the lowest percentage in two decades of Pew Research Center polling. When online news consumers are later probed separately if they happened to read anything on a newspaper website, the total rises to […]

Sep. 12, 2010

Section 4: Who is Listening, Watching, Reading – and Why

Not all Americans are looking for the same things when they turn to the news. With the wide array of news sources now available, the regular audiences for various news outlets offer differing top reasons why those sources appeal to them. Regular CNN viewers, for example, overwhelmingly say they turn to CNN for the latest […]

Sep. 13, 2009

Press Accuracy Rating Hits Two Decade Low

The public’s assessment of the accuracy of news stories is now at its lowest level in more than two decades of Pew Research surveys, and Americans’ views of media bias and independence now match previous lows. Just 29% of Americans say that news organizations generally get the facts straight, while 63% say that news […]

Feb. 26, 2009

Newspapers Face a Challenging Calculus

Aug. 17, 2008

Watching, Reading and Listening to the News

Six years ago, about as many people said they regularly watched one of the nightly network news broadcasts as said they regularly watched a cable news channel. But in subsequent news consumption surveys, cable news has steadily increased its advantage over the nightly network news. In the current survey, 39% of the public reports watching […]

Aug. 17, 2008

Media Credibility

The public continues to express skepticism about what they see, hear and read in the media. No major news outlet – whether broadcast or cable, print or online – stands out as particularly credible. There has been little change in public perceptions of the credibility of most major news organizations between 2006 and 2008. Over […]

Mar. 17, 2008

Section II: The Changing Media Environment

Journalists express generally positive opinions about technology-driven changes in news production and delivery. By and large, they are most positive about the changes that give a reader or viewer more news choices and input, but that do not compromise the journalist’s role as the key provider and interpreter of news. Indeed, most journalists still see […]

Jul. 30, 2006

Online Papers Modestly Boost Newspaper Readership

A decade ago, just one-in-fifty Americans got the news with some regularity from what was then a brand new source ­ the internet. Today, nearly one-in-three regularly get news online. But the growth of the online news audience has slowed considerably since 2000, particularly among the very young, who are now somewhat less likely […]

Jul. 30, 2006

Section 2: The Challenge for Newspapers

The latest news consumption study confirms the sluggish circulation figures reported by most newspapers. Four-in-ten Americans reported reading a newspaper “yesterday” in the survey, down from 50% a decade ago. And the drop-off is even more severe over the longer term. A 1965 Gallup survey found fully 71% reading a paper on the previous day. […]

Jun. 26, 2005

Public More Critical of Press, But Goodwill Persists

Summary of Findings Public attitudes toward the press, which have been on a downward track for years, have become more negative in several key areas. Growing numbers of people question the news media’s patriotism and fairness. Perceptions of political bias also have risen over the past two years. Yet despite these criticisms, most Americans continue […]

Jun. 8, 2004

I. Where Americans Go for News

Americans’ news habits have changed little over the past two years. Network and local TV news viewership has been largely stable since 2002. Daily newspaper readership remains at 42% (it was 41% two years ago). And the percentage of Americans who listen to news on the radio on a typical day is virtually unchanged since […]

Jul. 1, 2002

Young People are Reading–Everything but Newspapers

by Andrew Kohut for Columbia Journalism Review

Jun. 11, 2000

Section I: The Changing Media Landscape

The revolution in communications technology is clearly changing the way Americans live, and it has created a highly competitive environment for those who provide news and information to the public. Nearly seven-in-ten Americans (68%) now use a computer on at least an occasional basis, up from 61% in 1998 and 58% in 1996. Almost as […]

Jun. 8, 1998

Section 2: Reading, Watching and Listening to the News

The public’s news interests help explain the relative resilience of these news sources. Crime, health and community — the focus of much of today’s local news — are the subjects that most interest Americans. The public expresses considerably less interest in news about political figures and events in Washington and international affairs — topics which […]

Dec. 20, 1992

Press Sees Coverage as Having Hurt Bush Election Chances

Report Summary A substantial majority (55%) of the American journalists who followed the 1992 presidential campaign believe that George Bush’s candidacy was damaged by the way the press covered him. Only 11% feel that Gov. Bill Clinton’s campaign was harmed by the way the press covered his drive to the presidency. Moreover, one out of […]