Multi-section ReportsAugust 30, 2011

Muslim Americans: No Signs of Growth in Alienation or Support for Extremism

As the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaches, a comprehensive public opinion survey finds no indication of increased alienation or anger among Muslim Americans in response to concerns about home-grown Islamic terrorists, controversies about the building of mosques and other pressures that have been brought to bear on this high-profile minority group in recent years.

PublicationsSeptember 9, 2009

Muslims Widely Seen As Facing Discrimination

Eight years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Americans see Muslims as facing more discrimination inside the U.S. than other major religious groups. Nearly six-in-ten adults (58%) say that Muslims are subject to a lot of discrimination, far more than say the same about Jews, evangelical Christians, atheists or Mormons. In fact, of all […]

Methodology ReportsMarch 6, 2009

Why Surveys of Muslim Americans Differ

PublicationsJuly 26, 2005

Views of Muslim-Americans Hold Steady After London Bombings

Summary of Findings The July 7 terrorist bombings in London drew considerable public attention and raised fears of another attack in the United States, but these concerns do not translate into less favorable opinions of either Muslim-Americans or Islam. And compared with 2003, fewer now say that Islam is more likely than other religions to […]

CommentaryFebruary 3, 2005

Iraqi Vote Mirrors Desire for Democracy in Muslim World

A Pew Global Attitudes Project commentary

CommentaryMay 13, 2004

Global Gender Gaps

By Nicole Speulda and Mary McIntosh

Multi-section ReportsDecember 6, 2001

Post September 11 Attitudes

Introduction and Summary The Sept. 11 attacks have increased the prominence of religion in the United States to an extraordinary degree, but not at the expense of acceptance of religious minorities. Fully 78% now say religion’s influence in American life is growing ­ up from 37% eight months ago and the highest mark on this […]