February 16, 2017

In First Month, Views of Trump Are Already Strongly Felt, Deeply Polarized

4. Attitudes toward increasing diversity in the U.S.

Nearly two-thirds of Americans (64%) say an increasing number of people from different races, ethnic groups and nationalities in the U.S. makes the country a better place to live; fewer (29%) think growing diversity in the country does not make much difference, and just 5% think it makes the country a worse place to live.

The share that thinks growing diversity makes the country a better place to live has increased eight points from last August, when a smaller majority (56%) held this view.

An overwhelming share of adults with a postgraduate degree (79%) say that growing diversity makes the U.S. a better place to live, as do about seven-in-ten of those with a college degree or some college experience. About half of those with a high school diploma or less education (53%) think more people of different races and ethnicities in the U.S. makes the country a better place; 36% think it makes no difference either way.

Majorities across all age groups think increasing diversity makes the U.S. a better place, though younger adults are somewhat more likely to say this than adults ages 50 and older.

Today, 76% of Democrats and Democratic leaners think growing diversity in the U.S. makes the country better. The share of Democrats who say this is up 10 points since August.

The shift in views is particularly notable among conservative and moderate Democrats. About seven-in-ten (71%) now say increasing diversity makes the country a better place, up from 59% who said this in August.

Among Republicans, about half think increasing diversity makes the country better (51%), and 38% think it does not make much difference; 8% think growing diversity makes the country a worse place to live. Conservative Republicans are about as likely to say growing diversity makes the country a better place to live (45%) as to say it doesn’t make much difference (42%). Views among this group are little changed since August.

Moderate and liberal Republicans are more likely to say the country is a better place to live because of growing diversity than to say it does not make a difference (62% vs. 31%). The share of moderate and liberal Republicans who think the country is a better place with more diversity is up 11 points since August.