August 29, 2011

Muslim Americans: No Signs of Growth in Alienation or Support for Extremism

Who Are Muslim Americans?

A 63% majority of Muslim Americans are first-generation immigrants to the U.S., with 45% having arrived in the U.S. since 1990. And 70% of Muslim Americans born outside the U.S. are U.S. citizens, which is a much higher rate of citizenship than among the broader immigrant population in the U.S.

Cite this publication: “Muslim Americans: No Signs of Growth in Alienation or Support for Extremism.” Pew Research Center, Washington, D.C. (August 30, 2011) http://www.people-press.org/2011/08/30/muslim-americans-no-signs-of-growth-in-alienation-or-support-for-extremism/, accessed on July 22, 2014.

As the 1oth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaches, a comprehensive public opinion survey finds no indication of increased alienation or anger among Muslim Americans in response to concerns about home-grown Islamic terrorists, controversies about the building of mosques and other pressures that have been brought to bear on this high-profile minority group in recent years.